Social Media Strategy and Executive Blogging

imgres-3More and more, execs are being prompted by their boards, their PR staff and their agency partners to blog. They know the importance of social media. They’ve seen the number of social media-focused panels triple and quadruple at their favorite marketing conferences from ad:tech to TED. They are beginning to listen seriously to what their customers are saying about their products and brands with social media monitoring tools and are even facilitating more consumer-driven dialog by building community platforms for customer feedback and ongoing dialog.

But when it comes to writing their own blog, marketing execs often are slow to start because they don’t know what they want to say.

I thought this recent post by the CMO of Prosper, an auction-based peer-to-peer lending site (and, yes, a Site client), was a terrific example of exactly what a marketing executive blog post ought to look like:

1) It’s timely. The subject of the post is an initiative Prosper was to launch that week.

2) It’s personal. The post speaks to Catherine’s personal and direct experience with the initiative.

3) It’s a gateway to more content. The post includes a number of links to other parts of the site giving readers a number of avenues for more content.

With all the pressure on CMOs today for accountable, metrics-driven, move-the-needle marketing, it can be difficult to justify pausing your bottom-line focus to write a blog post.

But to my mind, executive participation in social media is a crucial part of a comprehensive social media strategy. Even if we have the listening technology, analytical staff and community marketers to build a relationship marketing nirvana, publishing our thoughts about the business, the brand or the industry and inviting public comment should always be a part of our social media marketing plan.

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